Eric Milnes : Conductor - Organist - Harpsichordist - Pianist

Eric Milnes :
 Conductor -
Organist -
Harpsichordist -
Pianist





 






 

Discography : Amazon.com      Discography : ATMA Classique



PERFORMANCE VIDEOS DIRECTED BY ERIC MILNES
 

Eric Milnes conducts
J. S. Bach Cantata #4
Christ Lag in Todesbanden
Regensburg Festival
Germany

Eric Milnes conducts
J. Ph. Rameau
Grande Motet - In convertando
Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

Eric Milnes conducts
Hidalgo Gutierrez
Magnificat

Trinity Wall Street
New York


 

 
 
Eric Milnes conducts
Johann Sebastian Bach
St John Passion

Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

Eric Milnes conducts
J. S. Bach
St. Matthew Passion
Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

Eric Milnes conducts
Jean Baptiste Lully
Grande Motet Exaudiat te dominus

Ensemble L'harmonie des Saisons
Granby, Quebec

 
   
Eric Milnes plays
Maurice Durufle
Veni Creator Spiritus
St. John's of Lattingtown
Locust Valley, New York
Eric Milnes  plays
Nicolas de Grigny
Veni Creator Spiritus

St. John's of Lattingtown
Locust Valley, New York

Eric Milnes conducts
J. S. Bach Cantata #106
Gottes Zeit ist die allerbeste Zeit
Montreal Festival
Quebec


 

   
Eric Milnes conducts
J. S. Bach Cantata #7
Es ist das Heil uns kommen her
Regensburg Festival
Germany
Eric Milnes conducts
Recording : Fuera, fuera
Roque Jacínto de Chavarrí
18th Century Bolivian Baroque

DISQUES ATMA CLASSIQUE
Eric Milnes conducts
J. S. Bach Cantata #1
Wie schoen leuchtet der Morgenstern
Montreal Festival
Quebec

 
   
Eric Milnes conducts
Fuera, fuera
Roque de Chavarri
Festival Baroque Bolivia
San Xavier, Bolivia
Eric Milnes conducts
Cum Sancto Spirito from B minor Mass
J. S. Bach
St. Michael's Church
New York, New York
Eric Milnes conducts
Magnificat Excerpts
J. S. Bach
Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

 

 


 

Commercial Recordings
Directed
by Eric Milnes

Bach 1
Johann Sebastian Bach
Sacred Cantatas Vol. I

AMAZON

Bach 2
Johann Sebastian Bach
Sacred Cantatas Vol. II

AMAZON

Bach 3
Johann Sebastian Bach
Sacred Cantatas Vol. III

AMAZON

Bach 4
Johann Sebastian Bach
Sacred Cantatas Vol. IV

AMAZON

Bach 5
Johann Sebastian Bach
Sacred Cantatas Vol. V

ATMA Classique
 

Bach St John
Johann Sebastian Bach
The Passion According to St. John

AMAZON

Acis
Georg Friedrich Handel
Acis & Galatea

ITUNES
Bach Brandenburgs
Johann Sebastian Bach
New Brandenburg Concerti
AMAZON
Schutz
Heinrich Schutz
Kleine Geistliche Konzerte

AMAZON
 

Venezia
 Music from 17th Century Venice

ATMA CLASSIQUE
Promotional Video

Rossi 2
Salamone Rossi  Vol. I
Music for the Sabbath

AMAZON
 

Rossi 3
Salamone Rossi Vol II
Music for the Festivals

AMAZON

Dresden
Divoti Affetti
18th century sacred music from Dresden

AMAZON

Biber
Heinrich Biber
Mystery Sonatas

AMAZON 

Beatles Baroque
Beatles Baroque
Vol 1, 2, 3

AMAZON

  ATMA CLASSIQUE
20 years Anniversary
Promotional Video
Features Eric Milnes

 

Trinity Consort, Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

 

The Montreal Festival
Montreal, Quebec

 

The Regensburg Festival
Regensburg, Germany

 

The Passau Festival
Passau, Austria

 

L'Harmonie des Saisons
Granby, Quebec

 

Festival Baroque
San Xavier, Bolivia

 

Trinity Consort, Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

 

 

The Montreal Festival

 

Trinity Consort, Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

 

 

Trinity Consort, Trinity Cathedral
Portland, Oregon

 

The Forbidden City Concert Hall
Beijing, China

 

 

 

'

Acis and Galatea' By Handel
St. John's Chorale
Eric Milnes, Director

Merkin Concert Hall 129 West 67th Street

By JOHN ROCKWELL
 

If Eric J. Milnes lived in Europe, he would have regular outings on the state radio and a big-time record contract and an international reputation, rather like Marc Minkowski in Paris. Instead, Mr. Milnes runs an organization called the St. John's Chorale, based at a church in Locust Valley, L.I. But in his occasional forays into Manhattan, he offers performances of a polish and a stylish spirit that need apologize to no one.

The latest such foray was a performance of Handel's miraculous masque "Acis and Galatea" on Wednesday night. One calls this score miraculous because its blend of pastoral charm and elegantly ingenious complexity sets it apart even within Handel's own oeuvre.

Wednesday's performance had a few rough edges, betraying budgetary constraints, but only a few. The period-instruments ensemble played with skill, Mr. Milnes both conducting and playing the harpsichord and organ (he was also the soloist for a warm-up Handel Organ Concerto). The sheer ebullience of the music-making, the way it surged forward with an energy that was never metronomic, spoke directly to the source of Handel's genius.

The singers were excellent as well. A slight accent aside, the Norwegian-born, Danish-based Bente Vist made a touching Galatea, Nathaniel Watson a stern Polyphemus and Michael Hume a deft Damon. But the clear standout was Jeffrey Thomas as Acis in a performance that blended tenorial allure with particularly adept period ornamentation.

 

 

The New York Times

Review/Music

The First 'Messiah' of Many

By BERNARD HOLLAND
 

Wednesday's ''Messiah'' performance at Merkin Concert Hall was one of the first of the Christmas season, with many more in various sizes and shapes to come. But so vibrant was the singing and playing of the St. John's Chorale and Chamber Orchestra that all other ''Messiahs'' this year could seem anticlimactic.

Music at St. John's is a fairly new phenomenon on Long Island. The group (musicians and singers number about 30) are led by Eric Milnes, who conducts from the harpsichord. The instruments are made and played according to 18th-century specifications, and the swift tempos, short phrase lengths and curt inflection also represent intelligent attempts to perform Handel as his own audiences might have expected to hear it. This was the ensemble's New York debut.

The singing was splendid - confidently together and pure of tone. The seven soloists emerged from the group for their individual moments and melted back into it for the massed choruses. Mr. Milnes seems to have prepared not only an accurate ensemble, but also one that truly luxuriated in the warmth of what they were doing. Even the instrumentalists -headed by Evan Johnson (violin) and Loretta O'Sullivan (cello) and drawn from the usual hard-working pool of East Coast early-music performers - had smiles on their faces.

The solo work was appropriately light, usually straightened in tone and conscientiously ornamented. Michael Hume's tenor voice is not of great beauty, but his musicality was impressive; and although Zoe Hwang's emotional involvement bordered on the extreme, an effective order and control were ultimately maintained. Nathaniel Watson and Wilbur Pauley sang the darker men's solos with confidence. The remaining singers were Phyllis Jo Kubey, Rachel Rosales and Bente Vist. Fred Holmgren took the Baroque trumpet parts surely.